RSS

Teacher’s Guide

Lesson plan for Rumpelstilskin

Title: Rumpelstiltskin retold by the Angela Lanyon
Overview: This lesson provides literature-based reading and writing activities for form 1 and form 2. This drama develops reading and writing skills and learns about honesty, thoughtfulness, greed, promise-keeping and fairness. A persuasive letter will demonstrate what they have learned.
Objectives:
  1. Students will recall information to identify story characters, main ideas, story details and story sequence. Students will write persuasive letters to change things they think are unfair.
  2. Students will complete an art project about the “meaning” of their names. Students will relate story events to personal experiences, as well as character traits of honesty/truthfulness and/or fairness. Students will identify possible alternate story events and/or story endings.
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Greater than 120 Minutes
Technology Resources Needed: Computer with Internet access and LCD
Background/Preparation: Students should be able to perform basic Internet searches and use word processing software independently or with assistance.
Procedures: 1.)Begin by asking students if they have ever made a promise to someone. Allow time for students to share experiences. Discuss keeping promises and the consequences and allow time for students to share.2.)Access the online cartoon, Rumpelstiltskinby the Grimm Brothers. It is also available in the blog.3.)Read the story with children. When reaching the part of the story about Rumpelstiltskin telling Lisa to guess his name, give each student large letters (each letter of his/her first name).4.)Have them decorate the letters with pictures or words that represent themselves and make posters to display in the classroom or hallway. Also, allow time for students to use a “name book” or do an Internet search to find the meaning of their names.5.)Finish reading the story, Rumpelstiltskin. Allow time for student comments and/or to relate story back to personal experiences.6.)Have students to identify story characters, main idea, story details, and sequence.7.) Use the Interactive Literatureprogram as an exercise for the students to check their understandings.8.)Relate the lessons on Honesty/Truthfulness and/or Fairness.9.)Have students brainstorm in small groups about something they think is unfair (relate to Rumpelstiltskin asking for Lisa’s first-born child). Allow time to share in large group. Have students spend time writing a persuasive letter to the teacher or principal about something they perceive as unfair in school. Allow time for self-editing and peer editing. When students complete paragraph or letter, and the letter has been assessed by teacher, teacher may want to let them deliver the letters to the addressee.
(Read-Write-Think)10.)Have students brainstorm (large group, small group or individually, according to student ability) ways the drama could have been different. For instance, what would have happened if Lisa had refused? Have entire class or small groups work together to write sentences to change the story and develop their own conclusions to the story, Rumpelstiltskin.
Assessment Strategies: Teacher may access students’ knowledge of main ideas, characters, sequence, and story details through a teacher-made test. Persuasive letters will be assessed using the attached rubric.

 

Lesson plan for Flipping Fantastic

Title: Flipping Fantastic by Jane Langford
Overview: Students will exposed to the main idea of the short story and they need to create a newsletter with information taken from the short story “Flipping Fantastic” Students will work in pairs and decide which parts of the newsletter each will be responsible for completing.   The finished newsletter will be published for the class to view.
Objectives:
  1. Students will recall information to identify the gist of the short story.
  2. Students will exposed to do and complete a newsletter.
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Greater than 60 Minutes
Technology Resources Needed: Computer with Internet access and LCD
Background/Preparation: Students should be familiar enough with the short story “Flipping Fantastic” to be able to complete this assignment.   Students should be able to note how the characters and setting are a large part of the story. 
Procedures: 1.)Students are asked about the gist of the story in order to recall the short story.2.) Students are guided to the Interactive Literatureprogram to do the exercises to allow them to have a better understanding of the short story.3.) Then students will be paired by teacher.4.) An explanation of the assignment will be reviewed.(handouts of newsletter templates)3.) Students will take time to decide which newsletter template they want to use. 4.) Students will begin gathering information and creating their newsletter.5.) Students will edit and revise their newsletter.  Peer editing will be used.6.) Students will print a copy of their newsletter and then present them to class. Student work will be displayed in classroom.
Assessment Strategies: Students will be assessed according to finished newsletter

 

Lesson plan for One is One and All Alone 

Title: One is One and All Alone by Nicholas Fisk
Overview: After reviewing the elements of the short story, students develop a storyboard from a published or original story.
Objectives:
  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the parts of a short story by mapping the short story.
  2. Students will develop and translate the story into storyboards. Students will critique and edit the storyboard.
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Greater than 60 Minutes
Technology Resources Needed: Computer with Internet access and LCD
Background/Preparation: Students should be familiar enough with the short story “One is One and All Alone” to be able to complete this assignment. 
Procedures: 1.) Lead students in a discussion of the parts of a short story (exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and ending). Discuss with the students the application of these terms to a story.2.) Students are guided to the Interactive Literatureprogram to do the exercises to allow them to have a better understanding of the short story.3.) Then students are asked to assign the mapping of the short story. Instruct students to make note of examples of figurative language, favorite lines, and the most important quips or dialogue from the story.4.) Lead a discussion on how a short story can translate into film. (By this time, most students have seen a story they’ve read translated into film.) Explain that a successful film depends on careful storyboarding. 5.) Using the short stories mapped previously, assign students the completion of a storyboard and ask them to present their storyboard.
Assessment Strategies: Students should be assessed throughout the completion of storyboard.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Copyright©2011Vithya Subramaniam
SKBI6133 Computer Application in Esol
PPBL, FSSK, UKM.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: